Rachael Herman

Category: Sketches and Paintings

Lilac Wisteria (2013-4), R. Herman

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Hello friends.

For those of you that are interested, here is my latest piece of art: a commission entitled, ‘Lilac Wisteria.’ My client intends to hang this artwork in their kitchen; a light and airy space, perfect for this large, statement piece.

My next project is a portrait. I am tremendously excited to start this, as portraits are indeed my fave, so watch this space…!

Rachael.

P.S. Apologies for the low-budget photograph; I have not yet had the chance to take one in the bright spring sunlight due to painting it over the dark winter months

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Unique (2013), R.Herman

'Unique' (2013) R. Herman, oil on  canvas, 30 x 50 cm,

Unique, Rachael Herman (2013), oil on canvas, 30 x 50cm

Considering I painted this piece way back in October, this post is a little late off the mark, but here it is anyway…

This painting depicts a 16.1 Dark Bay Dutch Warmblood (or ‘quite big dark brown horse’ to those of us who are equinely challenged) and was a (slightly belated) present for the horse’s previous owner, Cat. Unfortunately the lovely horse, Unique, had to be sold, so the painting was intended to be a sort of commemorative piece. A pretty horse, I’m sure you’ll agree!

Rachael.

Graphite Pencil Study (08/12), R.Herman

It’s been a while. Around 2 months in fact. That’s not to say that I have been neglecting my artistry on account of it being the Summer hols, no sir. I have in truth been beavering away, website designing of all things (more on that in a later post!). I have also been presented with the fantastic opportunity to impress some of my (questionable) artistic prowess onto the minds of the young. In other words I have myself a tutee; an apprentice if you will, not dissimilar to the great masters themselves. No really, it has been wonderful to not only be asked to teach someone the basics, but to actually share in the achievement of completing a beautiful piece of work. (I am sounding far too emotional, forgive me, I shall stop.) Anyway, the graphite study above is the result of one of these tutoring sessions. One may recognise this as a rip-off of a drawing that is already in existence, and one would be correct. I have merely forgotten who the artist and subject are. Whoops. Please don’t let that put you off, however, I am simply using these little studies as an excuse to start blogging again, rather than claiming they are great pieces of work!

Enjoy,

Rach.

At Rest (06/2012), R.Herman

At Rest, Rachael Herman (2012), oil on canvas, 500 mm x 500 mm

At first glance, one could perhaps be duped into thinking that these here limbs are just a run-of-the-mill pair of horse legs, and yes, to a great extent, they are. However, what struck me as unique (the horse is in fact called ‘Unique’. See what I did there…) about these particular equine appendages is the stance in which they are positioned – a rather dainty ‘quatrieme devant’ in fact – so much so I simply had to recapture the moment in oils.

Weston (05/2012), R.Herman

Weston Rachael Herman (2012), oil on canvas, 800 mm x 700 mm

Please welcome my latest piece that I have been beavering away at for these past few weeks. Confined to my little bedroom, amidst the fumes of turpentine and frustration, I am happy to say that I have finally finished this study of Cat’s fabulous horse, Unique. It does appear to be devoid of a rider (soz Cat), as I wanted to portray the beautiful creature trotting about her meadow freely, as nature intended, or something like that. (Basically, I acted out of cowardice, as I was too scared to paint not only a horse, but a person atop the horse, as painting a horsey alone is a mighty challenge in itself!)

As far as the technical aspects of the piece are concerned, I was going for a more impressionistic approach – you know, all Monet and such. A prime example of this is demonstrated by the trees in the left of the scene, which accounts for there being less focus on form and more on colour and the interplay of light. This is a style I am thus far unfamiliar with in my own practise, hence why it probably looks terrible, but hey, I’ll put that one down to experience I guess… As far as the horse is concerned, I tackled that in my usual ‘blend the colours like there’s no tomorow’ approach – a failsafe when faced with one of those difficult equine shapes.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy it.

Rach.

Invasion! (05/2012), R.Herman

Invasion! Rachael Herman (2012), Oil on canvas, 406 mm x 305 mm

Adversary of the humble hay-fever suffer, this fiendish yellow flower has become the source of inspiration for my most recent painting. Entitled, Invasion!, this piece serves to commemorate that time of year, around late Springtime, when East Anglia is subject to a sudden onslaught from this seemingly unsuspicious beast. Noses astream and eyes ablaze from scratching, this foe sure a sinus’ worst nightmare.

Such a shame, as it is rather a delightful colour combination: the cadmium yellow against that azure sky.

Poppies (04/2012), R.Herman

Oil on linen canvas, 50cm x 50cm

This still life study was created using the old faithful, oil paints partnered with a new friend, the linen canvas. As it was a commission, I was initially going to base the piece on your run-of-the-mill google image of some poppies, however, I thought no, I am going to force myself to work from life. And I am so pleased I did, as I was able to get a proper feel for how the light – if a bit dingy – effected the overall appearance of the petals, creating a rather wonderful array of colours and shadows.

The composition is a bit of a Georgia O’Keefe rip off, mind – although minus the connotations with female genitalia… I don’t think my friend would be too pleased with that.

WW1 Tank (03/2012), R. Herman

WW1 Tank, graphite pencil on cartridge paper, 30 x 20cm

A present for somebody who has an unhealthy fascination with tanks.

Ishia

This is my latest project: a portrait of one of the inhabitants of a village in the Gambia where a friend regularly makes charitable trips providing the local school with teaching material, buildings for staff and seeds for self-sufficiency.

One of the pupils at this school is a girl named Ishia and she is, I believe, 10 years of age. Her piercing gaze and beautiful headscarf were two major influences in making the decision to paint her.

The piece is 65cm x 45cm and is oil on canvas board.

Bits and Bobs

A few odds and ends of sketches completed whilst either out and about (ie. the Holt park studies) or confined to the indoors on a rainy day.

Holt Park 1, watercolour on cartridge paper, 30cm x 20cm

Holt Park 2, graphite pencil on cartridge paper, 30cm x 20cm

Red grape study, watercolour on cartridge paper, 30 cm x 20cm

Ishia eye study, graphite pencil on cartridge paper, 30cm x 20cm